Addressing Challenges at the Intersection of Civil Rights and Technology

Authors: Laura Moy and Gabrielle Rejouis


Summary 

Modern civil rights challenges are technically complex. Today, decisions made by algorithms, rather than people, limit opportunities for historically disadvantaged groups in critical areas like housing, employment, and credit. The next administration should establish a broad, new task force, led by the U.S. Chief Technology Officer (CTO), to address issues at the intersection of civil rights and emerging technologies. The task force should encourage federal agencies to prioritize regulatory and enforcement activities where tech and civil rights overlap, and to increase temporary exchanges of staff between agencies to facilitate cross-pollination of civil rights and tech expertise. The Administration should also prioritize appointment of key agency personnel who are committed to addressing tech/civil rights challenges.


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About the Authors

Laura Moy is an Associate Professor of Law at Georgetown and the Director of Georgetown Law’s Communications & Technology Law Clinic, where she leads a team of staff attorneys and law students representing nonprofit organizations in a range of technology policy matters before federal agencies. She is also Associate Director of the Center on Privacy & Technology, a small think tank at the law school that conducts research and advocacy on issues at the intersection of technology and civil rights. As a policy expert, Professor Moy has written, spoken, and advocated before agencies and Congress on consumer privacy, algorithmic bias, law enforcement surveillance, data security, device portability, copyright, and net neutrality,



Gabrielle Rejouis is a Senior Policy Manager on Color Of Change’s Media, Culture, and Economic Justice team. She develops campaigns to challenge anticompetitive practices and to ensure effective regulation of the tech industry. She previously worked at the Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law, where she advocated for civil rights protections in tech policy and worker data protections. Gabrielle received her J.D. from Georgetown Law with a Certificate in Refugee and Humanitarian Emergencies.